The hot red chili pepper contest

The fire from the south that gets your metabolism going

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It was not born here, but millennia ago in the lands of present-day Latin American where the Natives cultivated it for its taste and properties, which they had already began to recognize by observing its environment.

During the colonial period, the Spaniards discovered it and brought it to Europe and Africa, where it was used both for cooking and preserving food, especially in the poorest areas where the greatest need was to preserve what little nature could offer. The area of Reggio Calabria, thanks to its warm climate that is comparable to that of Mexico and Tropical Chile, is the area that has contributed to the cultivation of this product on Italian soil. Today, Calabrian chilli is among one of the most well-known products used as a base for gastronomic specialities and traditional dishes.

Calabrian chilli pepper

Intense, tasty, and healthy

The Calabria chilli pepper is not only spicy, it is also flavourful. Past and recent studies have confirmed many beneficial properties including: the presence of capsaicin, which gives it its spicy taste on the tongue and palate, reduces stress by producing a release of adrenaline that immediately invigorates the body with new energy, resulting in the release of endorphins (endogenous opioids with a powerful analgesic and exciting activity). This is why capsaicin has been introduced in many supplements. Acts as a stimulant: it can regulate blood pressure and improve circulation. It is rich in antiseptic properties: contrary to the burning sensation it causes, it helps ulcers and infections of the gastrointestinal tract disappear. Helps indigestion. Stimulates the basal metabolism, making it a reliable aid even in diets designed to help people lose weight

 

 

DID YOU KNOW ...?

“A plate of spaghetti with garlic, oil, and chilli pepper acts as real cure.”

(Umberto Veronesi)

Traditional and innovative cuisine

There are so many recipes based on Calabrian chilli, that trying to provide a summary would be almost wrong. It is used in dry form (powder), oil, or fresh on pasta, meat, fish, soups, and vegetables. It is a product that, if its dosage is well regulated, can enhance all the flavours, acting not only on the taste receptors of the tongue, but also stimulating the nerve endings on the tongue and palate. Speaking of products, we do not stop at traditional ones: there is also chocolate, jams, and liqueurs. The Bomba Calabrese, a jar of hot peppers in oil in the shape of a bomb designed even with its fuse is not to be forgotten.